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A few weeks ago, members of the NEC left slate staged a virtual walkout after a tense factional atmosphere ensued over the body’s chairmanship and Corbyn’s recent suspension. Prominent Corbyn-affiliated figures, from Laura Pidcock to Howard Beckett, have scolded Keir Starmer and general secretary, David Evans, for their purging of the Labour left.

This is a theme that has taken hold since possibly Starmer’s leadership win in April. According to the Times, Labour has witnessed an exodus of approximately 250 members a day since the spring. Adding to that, high-profile socialist figures have quit the party in protest at its rightward shift. …


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To build a better future, Labour has a duty to end the Brexit impasse.

Four-and-a-half years of turmoil could come to a close in the coming days. The Conservative party’s Brexit bill is set to be voted on in the Commons, and with an 80-seat majority, Boris Johnson is likely to be successful in passing it.

The main debate that is sweeping through political circles is whether Labour under Keir Starmer should back the deal or choose to abstain to avoid blame after a possible economic fallout. The party notoriously lost a plethora of seats in leave-voting constituencies when proposing a second referendum, if elected to government. …


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The role of a CLP Youth Officer, according to the Labour Party website, is “ensuring young members get as much as they possibly can out of their membership”. With a new Labour leadership, a global public health pandemic and a bleak future for young people looking likely; there’s a lot to tackle with U27 members in the local party.

The young vote is crucial in the outcome of elections. A surge in this demographic voting for Jeremy Corbyn in 2017 was a defining moment for the Labour Party. That year, 62% of 18–24 year olds voted Labour in the general election, compared to 27% for the Conservatives. A similar event occurred in the 2019 snap election, with the same percentage of young voters believing in Labour policies a second time round. Moreover, a spike in party membership under Corbyn’s tenure was due to young voters feeling inspired by Labour’s socialist principles. …


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The ship had already sailed by the time Hillary Clinton had time to ponder her lack of campaigning efforts in the Rust Belt, particularly in the now not so reliable blue state of Wisconsin. The Badger State was narrowly beaten by Trump in 2016 after voting for every Democratic candidate since 1988. What went wrong is that Wisconsin was overlooked and its history of a battleground was ignored.

A mere 25,000 votes were the difference between Trump and Hillary four years ago. A Google consumer surveys poll conducted a few days before the nation went to the ballot box had Clinton ahead in Wisconsin by 12 points. However, the Democrats failed to gather momentum in a typically blue-collar state and faced a reckoning on results day when the working-class looked to the GOP for the first time in years. …


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In 2015, just three months after assuming the leadership of the Labour Party, Corbyn was reprimanded for attending a Stop the War coalition fundraising event by his colleagues, calling the organisation “disreputable”. He hit back with remarks stating that opposition to war should not be “denigrated or condemned”. After five years of being labelled “unpatriotic” and “terrorist-sympathising”, Corbyn holds firm with anti-war rhetoric under new party leadership, energising the leftists once again.

Corbyn, notorious for defying the party whip under New Labour, rallied 17 other Labour MPs this week to oppose the new overseas operations bill being touted by the government. With orders from Keir Starmer to abstain from voting, a comradely Corbyn remained committed to his principles and his controversial foreign policy agenda by saying no. …


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The US presidential election is less than eight weeks away and what’s in store for American democracy is terrifying. The contest between Donald Trump and Joe Biden has disillusioned the electorate in a repeat of 2016.

This may be heard to hear but it shouldn’t be surprising. Trump will most probably win the election this year, embarking on another four years of calamity and division. The dysfunctional US electoral system will see Trump’s ironclad base come out in droves to vote for their leader. Meanwhile voter suppression, gerrymandering and a lackadaisical Democratic nominee will leave Biden’s campaign commiserating.

The Democrats have fielded a moderate establishment candidate with a lifelong career of flaws. Biden has maintained a centrist tone throughout the campaign trail by avoiding policy requests and instead calling for the soul of the nation to return. Leftists in his ranks, inspired by Bernie Sanders’ campaigns in 2016 and 2020, have rallied round Biden with reticence. A green new deal, universal healthcare and the defunding of America’s militarised police have not been at the forefront like so many wished. Registered Democrats opted to play it safe in their primary elections by attempting to outbid Trump’s chaos with decency and pragmatism. …


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A message was circling across social media feeds on the bank holiday weekend, disseminated by trade union activists. It stated that “this long holiday weekend has been brought to you by the blood, sweat and tears of the labour movement”. This caption is certainly true and highlights the traditional influence of a long-standing trade union movement. With the worst public health crisis in over 100 years affecting the workforce, trade unions have stepped up to the plate once again.

After Covid hit and the majority of the nation was furloughed, angst-ridden workers worried whether there was a job to go back to. Key workers working in healthcare, retail, education, journalism and community care demanded safer working practises to do their job appropriately and diligently. For a long time, employers have ignored the cries of trade union representatives, taking advantage of their reduced powers under consecutive governments. …


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The initial theories surrounding globalisation sounded promising from the outset. The theories suggested that the global world order should stand in solidarity to ease diplomatic tensions so to avoid future world wars. With that, nations welcomed trade treaties with their neighbours to avoid economic downturns both domestically and abroad. Negotiating with your world partners allowed strict enforcement on international law, where crime knew no borders under Interpol and the Human Rights Watch. Many well-established organisations, from the United Nations to the European Union, garnered exceptional reputations from world leaders.

These components that came with globalisation are portrayed as essential and awe-inspiring to allow all countries to prosper side-by-side. Sadly, as many now realise this isn’t the case, these tenets become mired in publicised scandals that coincide with negative consequences of globalisation. …


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The antisemitism row that dominated Labour’s image during the Corbyn years came to a head this week. Seven former HQ staffers, as well as BBC journalist John Ware, were awarded financial compensation and an unreserved apology for defamation after an expose on the party’s antisemitism scandal aired.

There were numerous accusations by said staffers that senior Labour officials and key Corbyn aides undermined head office’s attempts to deal with rampant antisemitism in the rank-and-file. However, in a recent counter-attack dossier, many senior recruits in the party’s operational hub were alleged to have wilfully pursued an anti-Corbyn strategy ahead of the 2017 election. …


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In May, new Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer was asked about the ongoing land dispute of Kashmir. The semi-autonomous zone between India and Pakistan had been practically stripped of its self-determination status under the command of a hard right and nationalist Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi. Starmer, a fresh-faced successor to Jeremy Corbyn’s tenure, proclaimed the Kashmir issue a “bilateral” one.

This proclamation, often unnoticed but crucial, defines the trajectory of the Labour party under Starmer’s first 100 days since becoming leader. Corbyn, a lifelong and diplomatic advocate for peace and supporter of the underdog, stood in solidarity with Kashmir. …

About

Liam Barrett

Socialist commentator.

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